Monthly Archives: August 2011

Confederate Anxiety Over Slavery – August/September 1861

Slaveholders created the Confederate States of America to secure the ownership of human property. Free of the non-slaveholding states of the North, they believed, slavery’s future would be assured and the peculiar institution able to expand and prosper. Looking back at … Continue reading

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John C. Frémont’s Emancipation Proclamation

A momentous event in the history of emancipation in the United States occurred at the end of August 1861, as a result of the initiative of one man: John C. Frémont, the recently appointed commander of the U.S. Army’s Department … Continue reading

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Emancipation Sentiment Grows – August 1861

In August 1861, support for emancipation began to gain momentum in the North. With the realization after the Battle of Bull Run/Manassas the previous month that the Civil War would not be settled quickly, and that it would be costly … Continue reading

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Why the Slaves Fled, Part 2

Emmanuel Dabney over at Interpretive Challenges has a particularly interesting post relevant to the June 29 edition of Civil War Emancipation entitled “Why the Slaves Fled.” My June 29 post made the point that it was not only the prospect of freedom that led … Continue reading

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Were There Black Soldiers in July 1861? Part 4

At the risk of being accused of beating a dead horse, here is another relevant nugget about whether African Americans fought at the First Battle of Bull Run/Manassas on July 23, 1861. (Click on the links to read the first … Continue reading

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Limits of the Limits of the Contraband Policy

The July 10 edition of Civil War Emancipation featured a letter from Congressman Charles Calvert to Abraham Lincoln complaining of fugitive slaves from Maryland finding sanctuary with units of the Union army encamped in his state and the District of Columbia. … Continue reading

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International Emancipation – Summer 1861

There is a tendency in Civil War studies to see the war through a domestic-only perspective, neglecting its international manifestations except to the extent they affected the war at home. This approach is understandable given the conflict largely was internal, … Continue reading

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