Monthly Archives: May 2011

Emancipation and Confederate Recruitment

With the outbreak of the Civil War, white men in the South joined the Confederate Army in large numbers. However, with the white population of the North outnumbering the South over four to one, the Confederacy had no choice but … Continue reading

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The Day Everything Changed – May 23, 1861

May 23, 1861 is a very important day in the history of emancipation during the American Civil War. In retrospect, it was the date that slavery began to crumble. Civil War Emancipation has already dealt with this day in its … Continue reading

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A Slave Speaks – “We will all be free pretty soon”

One of the challenges of understanding the history of emancipation during the American Civil War is documenting the perspective of the slaves. The vast majority (probably over 90 percent) were not literate, and even when they were it was extremely … Continue reading

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A Tip of the Hat

I have deliberately tried in Civil War Emancipation not to toot my horn too much. My credentials as a historian are freely available to anyone who cares to read my profile blurb that gets added at bottom of each new … Continue reading

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A Picture is Worth a Thousand Words

It took the British, with their sophisticated, droll sense of humor to find anything funny about the outbreak of the American Civil War. Yet more than anyone else, Great Britain legitimately could take a small degree of pleasure in Spring … Continue reading

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A Prophet at the New York Times

As Civil War Emancipation indicated in its March 18 edition, what the future portended for slavery in Spring 1861 was uncertain. Conventional wisdom though at the time would have suggested the survival of the peculiar institution, at least for the … Continue reading

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Reassuring Missouri Slaveholders

As Adam Arenson has written about lately in Disunion in the New York Times, Missouri was on edge in Spring 1861, as a secessionist governor tangled with the state’s Unionist majority. Missouri was already a violent place, as the scene … Continue reading

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