Monthly Archives: February 2011

A Prophetic Voice from Kentucky

On June 21, 1861, the New York Times published a letter from an unnamed correspondent in Louisville, Kentucky, dated February 12.  In it, the writer discussed the blandishments of the Lower South states seeking to encourage the Blue Grass State … Continue reading

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Mississippi’s “A Declaration of Immediate Causes …”

Today, Civil War Emancipation continues its series of justifications offered by states that left the Union during the secession winter.  Today’s offering is “A Declaration of the Immediate Causes which Induce and Justify the Secession of the State of Mississippi from the … Continue reading

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John S. Preston at the Virginia Convention

Even as the Washington and Montgomery Conventions carried on with their respective business, another notable gathering started in Richmond, Virginia, on February 13, 1861.  Though Virginia had initiated the D.C. meeting at the Willard Hotel in a last-ditch attempt to … Continue reading

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A Fugitive Slave Wins His Freedom

February 18, 1861 is generally remembered as the day Jefferson Davis took his oath as Provisional President of the Confederacy (read Adam Goodheart’s fascinating analysis of Davis’ inaugural speech in Disunion).  But also on that day a brief story appeared in the … Continue reading

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Understanding the Slaves’ Power – Now and Then

Yesterday’s Disunion blog in the New York Times has a nice piece by John Ashworth, of the University of Nottingham, entitled “What the South Got Wrong.”  Ashworth explores the miscalculations by the South that helped lead to the Civil War … Continue reading

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Slave Trade Images – Feb. 16, 1861

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In the February 16, 1861 issue of The Illustrated London News the following two images appeared.  Both depict moments from a slave auction in Richmond, Virginia.  For decades before the Civil War, a lively internal slave trade flourished in the United … Continue reading

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How Strongly Should Slavery Be Protected?

On February 15, 1861, the Washington Convention at the Willard Hotel considered as a body for the first time the compromise that up to that point had been in committee.  The problem was that not one compromise emerged out of … Continue reading

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